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CHEAP College Books http://college-books-cheap.com Buy, Sell, and Rent College Text Books Sat, 24 Dec 2011 02:58:56 +0000 en hourly 1 10 Tips for Getting Good (or Better) Grades http://college-books-cheap.com/10-tips-for-getting-good-or-better-grades/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=10-tips-for-getting-good-or-better-grades http://college-books-cheap.com/10-tips-for-getting-good-or-better-grades/#comments Fri, 23 Dec 2011 22:23:55 +0000 jimcharlespe http://college-books-cheap.com/?p=80 I have developed these 10 tips for getting good grades. And by the way, these tips will work for you — whether you are a first-year student or a senior, whether at a small college or a large university. These tips are universal. So, if you are struggling with grades and interested in raising your grade point average, take a close look at these 10 tips for getting better grades.

1. Attend All Your Classes: Now, you might think this was an obvious one.  But if you want good grades, there are several reasons why you should attend all your classes:

  • Absorb classroom material. Even if the professor follows the textbook pretty closely, sitting in the classroom and listening to the lectures/discussions will help you absorb the materials.
  • Make presence known/participate. One of the benefits of going to college should be that you form a mentoring relationship with some of your professors, and that’s not going to happen if you don’t attend the classes. And often faculty have participation points (or bonus points), so beyond just attending, make an effort to be involved in the class discussions.
  • Earn attendance points. Many professors have attendance policies, so you can have a direct impact on your grade simply by attending.

Don’t forget to sit close to the front — historically, those who do are usually the best students.

2. Master Your Professors: Every professor has a different personality and system for running his/her classes, so it makes sense as early in the semester as possible to learn what the professor wants. Here are some ways to master your professors:

  • Understand course expectations. Most professors give out a class syllabus during the first week of classes — and it is your responsibility to know deadlines and all the requirements for the course.
  • Understand professors on personal level. Rather than viewing the professor as some figurehead at the front of the class who decides your fate in some abstract way, get to know your professor as a person. Visit him or her during office hours, or stay after class.
  • Communicate with professors when you are struggling. Especially at larger colleges and universities, the professor won’t know when you are struggling, so if you are having problems with the course work or the tests, schedule an appointment to meet with the professor and get the help you need.

3. Get/Stay Organized: You may have been one of the lucky few who has never needed a planner before, but college is all about multitasking, and you can easily get overwhelmed with due dates, team meetings, and other demands on your time. Here are some tips for getting organized:

  • Use a planner or other organization system. I’ve had my day-planner for years and cannot go anywhere without it. Others are that same way with their personal digital assistants.
  • Stay current with due dates/course calendars. It’s not enough to have a system — you have to use it! So once you have some sort of system, get in the habit of using it (and it will soon become second nature).
  • Keep homework, tests, and class papers in central location. Don’t just throw old homework assignments or tests in the back of your car or the floor of your dorm room. You’ll need these for studying for future tests, for meeting with your professor to discuss them, and for figuring your grade in the class… so, keep all your class materials in a central location.

4. Use Time Wisely: Even if you do not procrastinate and are the most organized person in the world, time can be one of your biggest enemies in college. Here are some tips for using time wisely:

  • Tackle harder work first. Yes, tackle the harder stuff first so that you are sure to have enough time to complete it. You’ll feel a greater sense of accomplishment completing the work in this order.
  • Take breaks as reward for work. Reward yourself for completing a major task by taking a break and chatting with a friend or watching some television. Not only are the breaks good motivation to help you complete something, you’ll also be more refreshed to tackle the next bit of work after a break.
  • Break larger projects into smaller, easy-to-accomplish pieces. If you have a massive term paper due at the end of the semester, break up the work into smaller chunks and assign deadlines to each part.
  • Do not overextend yourself; learn to say no. Besides all your academic work, you will also be asked to get involved in all sorts of clubs and organizations while in college — and at some point, you will have to learn to say no to some requests of your time.
  • Work hard to play hard. One of my favorite students used to say that she worked hard so that she would have the time to play hard — and that’s a good balance. Just make sure you do the work FIRST.

5. Become “Noteworthy”: Another reason for attending class is recording the class notes. These notes are vital clues to what the professor thinks is the most important material for you to learn, so besides taking notes, learn how to better use them to your advantage. Here are some specifics:

  • Be an active listener in class. Don’t read the newspaper, gossips with friends, or text your roommate during class. Instead, listen attentively and actively — and ask for clarification when you need it.
  • Take good notes in class. Whether taking notes from scratch or following a professor’s outline, the key for you will be to get the most important details down so that you can refer back to them when you need them.
  • Rewrite or organize notes on your computer outside of class. This suggestion may sound a little extreme, but the writing-to-learn literature shows that you can increase your understanding and retention of material by rewriting it.

6. Use the Textbook: Professors assign textbooks for a reason — and it’s not to make you broke; it’s to supplement the lectures and discussions from class. Do buy all the textbooks — and follow these tips for using it:

  • Read all assigned material. Sounds obvious, right? When a professor assigns a chapter, read the whole thing (unless told otherwise), including the opening vignettes, the case studies, and tables and exhibits.
  • Know what’s critical. At the same time, know what parts of the text are most critical. For example, in one of my classes, the vocabulary is most critical, and the textbook emphasizes the point by having all the terms and their definitions printed in the margins of every chapter.
  • Use outlining system to help comprehend material. Reading and highlighting the material in the text is just the minimum. To get the most of what you’re reading, you should also take notes and outline the material.

7. Follow Good Rules of Writing: Many classes require one or more writing assignments, from short responses to term papers, and you’ll do better on these assignments if you follow these rules of good writing:

  • Organize your thoughts before writing. Stream of consciousness works in a diary or journal (and may have worked in high school), but it’s best to map out an outline before you start the actual writing.
  • Understand requirements for paper. Every professor has a specific way he or she wants a paper organized, and it’s best to know them before you start to write. Be sure to understand the reference system and all the mechanics of the paper (font, margins, cover sheet, footnotes, etc.).
  • Write a draft (and get feedback when possible). Especially for larger papers, you’ll have a higher quality paper (and a better grade) if you can show the professor a draft early enough before the deadline to make changes.
  • Rewrite, edit, rewrite, edit, rewrite. Learn that editing and rewriting are your friends. No one is a good enough writer to whip out the final draft in one sitting. The best writers go through a process.
  • Proofread, proofread, proofread. Spellcheckers catch spelling errors, but not other problems, so learn the art of proofreading. Or better, have a buddy system with a friend in which you proofread each other’s papers.

8. Study, Study, Study: Another obvious one here? Perhaps, but the rule is you should be spending at least three hours outside of class for every hour in it. And for some classes, you’ll find you need a lot more time than that to master the material. So, here are some suggestions:

  • Study early and often. Breaking your studying into shorter periods of time will make less of a chore — and give your mind time to absorb the material before moving on.
  • Develop and practice good study habits. Make it a habit and studying will become second nature to you.
  • Know how you best study, learn material. Some people need complete silence to concentrate while others like a little noise. Find what works for you and stick with it.
  • Study with friends to gain support, but… don’t turn it into a social event. A study buddy can be a great tool, as long as you actually get some studying accomplished.
  • Make sure work is done before socializing. Studying is critical to learning, which is critical to better grades — so do the work before heading out to have fun.

9. Be a Good Test-Taker: Just about all college classes have exams, and sometimes the exams are the major portion of your final grade, so it’s important to become a good test-taker. Here are some hints:

  • Know what to expect on exams. Every professor has a style of test development, so obtain old copies or ask the professor directly. Know the types of questions that will be asked — as well as the content that will be covered.
  • Read questions carefully and plan answers. Take your time at the beginning of the test to read through all the instructions and make a plan of attack.
  • Pace yourself so you have plenty of time to complete all parts. And know the point v alues of questions, so you can be sure to complete the most important ones first in case time does run out.
  • Ask questions. If you don’t understand something, or need clarification of the question, ask the professor. Don’t wait to get the exam back and find you answered a question the wrong way.

10. Polish Those Verbal Communications Skills: Many classes include a presentation component, so use these tips to improve your verbal communications skills and maximize your grade:

  • Practice speeches, presentations. The best speeches and presentations are the well-rehearsed ones, so complete your script or outline early enough to have time to practice the presentation (and to make sure it falls within the specified time limit).
  • If using technology, always have a back-up. Technology is great, but sometimes it fails. If you have a PowerPoint presentation, make copies of it as a handout in case you need it.
  • Know the presentation situation — and plan accordingly. Every professor has a set of guidelines when grading presentations, and many classroom set-ups are different, so know the situation before going into the presentation.

Final Thoughts Following these guidelines should help your grades immensely, but here is one other tip. Remember to think of your professors as your allies, not your enemies..

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About RateMyProfessors.com http://college-books-cheap.com/apple-ipad-2-mc769lla-tablet/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=apple-ipad-2-mc769lla-tablet http://college-books-cheap.com/apple-ipad-2-mc769lla-tablet/#comments Thu, 22 Dec 2011 06:37:19 +0000 jimcharlespe http://college-books-cheap.com/?p=57 RateMyProfessors.com is the largest online destination for professor ratings. With 7,500+ schools and over 13,000,000 entirely student-generated comments and ratings, RateMyProfessors.com is the highest trafficked free site for quickly researching and rating 1,500,000+ professors from colleges and universities across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Over 3 million college students each month are using RateMyProfessors – join the fun!

Now, students can comment on and rate their school as well, by visiting their school’s RateMyProfessors page.

RateMyProfessors.com is built for college students, by college students. Choosing the best courses and professors is a rite of passage for every student, and connecting with peers on the site has become a key way for millions of students to navigate this process. The site does what students have been doing forever – checking in with each other – their friends, their brothers, their sisters, their classmates – to figure out who’s a great professor and who’s one you might want to avoid.

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10 Tips for Managing Stress http://college-books-cheap.com/new-economics-as-mainstream-economics/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-economics-as-mainstream-economics http://college-books-cheap.com/new-economics-as-mainstream-economics/#comments Thu, 22 Dec 2011 06:34:23 +0000 jimcharlespe http://college-books-cheap.com/?p=55 At any given point in time, most college students are stressed about something; it’s just part of going to school. While having stress in your life is normal and often unavoidable, being stressed is something you can control. Follow these ten tips to learn how to keep your stress in check and how to relax when it gets to be too much.

 Here’s How:

  1. Most Importantly: Don’t Stress About Being StressedThis may seem ridiculous at first, but it is listed first for a reason: when you’re feeling stressed, you feel like you’re on edge and everything is barely being held together. Don’t beat yourself up too badly about it! It’s all normal, and the best way to handle stress is  to not get more stressed about . . . being stressed. If you’re stressed out, admit it and figure out how to handle it. Focusing on it will only make things seem worse.
  2. Get Some SleepBeing in college means your sleep schedule is, most likely, far from ideal. Getting more sleep can help your mind refocus, recharge, and rebalance. This can mean a quick nap, a night when you go to bed early, or a promise to yourself to stick with a regular sleep schedule. Sometimes, one good night’s sleep can be all you need to hit the ground running amidst a stressful time.
  3. Get Some FoodSimilar to your sleep habits, your eating habits may have gone by the wayside when you started school. Think about what — and when — you’ve eaten over the past few days. You may think your stress is psychological, but you could also be feeling physical stress (and the “Freshman 15″) if you’re not fueling your body appropriately. Go eat something balanced and healthy: fruits and veggies, whole grains, protein. Make your mama proud with what you choose for dinner tonight! Lastly, if your meal plan itself is one more thing making you stressed, learn how to pick a plan that’s right for you.
  4. Get Some ExerciseYou may think that if you don’t have the time to sleep and eat properly, you definitely don’t have the time to exercise. Fair enough, but if you’re feeling stressed, it may be that you need to squeeze it in somehow. Exercise doesn’t necessarily have to involve a 2-hour, exhausting workout at the campus gym. It can mean a relaxing, 30-minute walk while listening to your favorite music. In fact, in a little over an hour, you can 1) walk 15 minutes to your favorite off-campus restaurant, 2) eat a quick and healthy meal, 3) walk back, and 4) take a power nap. Imagine how much better you’ll feel!
  5. Get Some Quiet TimeTake one moment and think: when was the last time you had some quality, quiet time alone? Personal space for students in college rarely exists. You may share your room, your bathroom, your classrooms, your dining hall, the gym, the bookstore, the library, and anywhere else you go during an average day. Finding a few moments of peace and quiet – with no cell phone, roommates, or crowds – might be just what you need. Stepping out from the crazy college environment for a few minutes can do wonders for reducing your stress.
  6. Get Some Social TimeHave you been working on that English paper for 3 days straight? Can you even see what you’re writing anymore for your Chemistry lab? You could be stressed because you’re being too focused on getting things done. Don’t forget that your brain is like a muscle, and even it needs a break every once in a while! Take a break and see a movie. Grab some friends and go out dancing. Hop a bus and hang out downtown for a few hours. Having a social life is an important part of your college experience, so don’t be afraid to keep it in the picture when you’re stressed. It could be when you need it most!
  7. Get Some FunYou may be stressed about one particular thing: a final paper due  Monday, a class presentation due Thursday. You basically just need to sit down and plow through it. If this is the case, try to figure out how to make it a little more fun and enjoyable. Is everyone writing final papers? Agree to work together in your room for 2 hours and then order pizza together for dinner. Do a lot of your classmates have huge presentations to put together? See if you can reserve a classroom or room in the library where you can all work together and share supplies. You may just lower everyone’s stress level.
  8. Get Some DistanceYou may be handling your own problems and trying to help others around you. While this can be nice for them, check in and be honest with yourself about how your helpful demeanor may be causing more stress in your life. It’s okay to take a step back and focus on yourself for a little while, especially if you are stressed and your academics are at risk. After all, how can you keep helping others if you’re not even in a state to help yourself? Figure out which things are causing you the most stress and how you can take a step back from each. And then, most importantly, take that step.
  9. Get a Little HelpIt can be hard to ask for help, and unless your friends are psychic, they may not know how stressed out you are. Most college students are going through the same things at the same thing, so don’t feel silly if you need to just vent for 30 minutes over coffee with a friend. It may help you process out what you need to do, and help you realize that the things you are so stressed about are actually pretty manageable. If you’re afraid of dumping too much on a friend, most colleges have counseling centers specifically for their students. Don’t be afraid to make an appointment if you think it will help.
  10. Get Some PerspectiveCollege life can be overwhelming. You want to hang out with your friends, join clubs, explore off campus, join a fraternity or sorority, and be involved in the campus newspaper. It can sometimes feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day . . . because there aren’t. There’s only so much any person can handle, but you need to remember the reason why you’re in school: academics. No matter how exciting your co-curricular life can be, you won’t be able to enjoy any of it if you don’t pass your classes. Make sure to keep your eye on the prize and then head out and change the world!

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8 Steps for Strong Time Management for College Students http://college-books-cheap.com/plug-in-php-100-power-solutions-simple-solutions-to-practical-php-problems/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=plug-in-php-100-power-solutions-simple-solutions-to-practical-php-problems http://college-books-cheap.com/plug-in-php-100-power-solutions-simple-solutions-to-practical-php-problems/#comments Thu, 22 Dec 2011 06:27:37 +0000 jimcharlespe http://college-books-cheap.com/?p=51 Within the first few days of starting college, many students quickly learn that managing their time is one of the most challenging — and difficult — aspects of being in school. With so much to do and keep track of, strong time management skills can make all the difference.

1. Get — and use — a calendar. It can be a paper calendar. It can be your cell phone. It can be a PDA. No matter what kind it is, though, make sure you have one.

2. Write down everything. Write down everything in one place. (Having multiple calendars just gives you more to do amidst an already tight schedule.) Schedule when you plan to sleep, when you are going to do your laundry, when you’re going to call your parents. The crazier your schedule gets, the more important this becomes.

3. Schedule time to relax. Don’t forget to schedule in time to relax and breathe. Just because your calendar goes from 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. doesn’t mean you can.

4. Keep trying new systems. If your cell phone calendar isn’t big enough, buy a paper one. If your paper one keeps getting torn, try a PDA. If you have too many things written down each day, try color-coding to help simplify. Very few college students make it through their programs without some kind of calendaring system; keep trying until you find one that works for you.

5. Allow for flexibility. Things inevitably come up that you weren’t expecting. You may not have known that your roommate’s birthday is this week, and you certainly don’t want to miss the celebrations! Leave room in your calendar so that you can move things around a little when needed.

6. Plan ahead. Do you have a large research paper due the last week of the semester? Work backward in your calendar and figure out how much time you need to write it, how much time you’ll need to research it, and how much time you’ll need to pick your topic. If you think you’ll need six weeks for the entire project, work backward from the due date and schedule the time into your calendar before it’s too late.

7. Plan for the unexpected. Sure, you just might be able to pull off two papers and a presentation during midterms week. But what happens if you catch the flu the night you’re supposed to be pulling the all-nighter? Expect the unexpected so you don’t have to spend more unplanned time trying to fix your mistakes.

8. Schedule rewards in. Your midterms week is a nightmare, but it will all be over Friday by 2:30. Schedule a fun afternoon and a nice dinner out with some friends; your brain will need it, and you can relax knowing that you’re not supposed to be doing anything else..

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College Books Cheap http://college-books-cheap.com/hello-world/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=hello-world http://college-books-cheap.com/hello-world/#comments Wed, 21 Dec 2011 05:43:36 +0000 jimcharlespe http://college-books-cheap.com/?p=1 I am so glad I found this site!! I was able to compare prices and saved over $250 from the college book store. WOW!!.

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